Elective International

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8.8 / 10 after 8 Reviews Based on overall, support & value average ratings

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Hello all,

My name is Christina and i am here to write a review on my Dental program in Yogyakarta with Elective International. I was on a 4 week dental program from 5/11/2018 - 2/12/2018.

Everyone that asks me wants to know mainly about how the food was, the hospital was good or not, doctors helpful or not, mentor, the accommodation was safe and nice, and was the WIFI working properly.

Let me just say to sum it up, i learned more about Dentistry then i would have in another other location for my Elective i had done in the past. I was also made to present my on my personal topic to a panel of doctors and chiefs. We also went out and had a medical camp in a rural village. I had such a wonderful time!.

Now for the logistical part. I was picked up from the airport on time, my accommodation was a guest house which was lovely cause i was around other international students too, plus i got my own room!! Indonesian food was delicious and i had a feast every day!! Yes the Wifi was brilliant, cause my mum didn't complain once about it when i facetimed her!.

Yogakrata is such a beautiful city, and people are really nice there. The mentors i had were sooo friendly and really made my stay there for comfortable!

So yes i would recommend it to anyone that is interested in their Dental or even medical elective there!!! I would def say that for the price i paid, i got complete value for my buck!!

Program:
Location:
Posted: December 13, 2018
Overall:
10
Support:
9
Value:
10
Age:
27

Hey everyone! My name is Matt – and I’m a medical student from Canada. I was super fortunate to be able to do an elective with the Elective International.

I went to Mombasa in Kenya, and did my placement at the Coast General Provincial Hospital. I participated in several medical disciplines, such as internal medicine, emergency medicine, and surgery.
Day to day, I helped out in taking histories and physical exams for patients entering the ER, rounded on inpatients in the general medicine wards, and assisted in surgeries for minor procedures. I also helped out with day clinics to provide free checkups for hundreds of orphans and children living in slum areas.

Doing medicine here was a fascinating experience. It shared similarities with doing medicine at home, but was also vastly different from back at home. For example:

1. Resources were often very limited
- I learned to take appreciation for the very simple things such as water, hand sanitizers, face masks, and gloves that often weren’t available.

2. Smartphones and computers weren’t ubiquitous the same way they are back at home – you had to rely more on memory more than ever instead of relying on being able to look things up.

3. Some doctors were so talented and intelligent: they were up to date with the latest international guidelines for management of conditions, but also had to improvise and work around the resource barriers they faced day-to-day

4. Patients were so grateful for any care and advice you and the hospital staff give them – this is often in contrast with medicine back at home where patients often feel entitled to their healthcare.

5. The shocking amount of good handwriting by doctors. Blew my mind. Normally, doctors’ writing is illegible back at home.

6. Lastly and most importantly, this experience reminded me why I wanted to do medicine in the first place – simply, to help people. In the western world, physicians can easily get bogged down with the unfulfilling, impersonal and mundane clerical and financial tasks (in other words, the business side of medicine). All this can really retract from the personal side of medicine. Here, it was you and the patient, and what you can do to help them. Here, it was very obvious that the patients really needed the help, and the ability to provide that was very gratifying.

I lived in student housing in a nice area in Mombasa, Kenya. Several other students were here and it was a blast. We had spacious rooms with mosquito nets of course, a shared kitchen with a cook, a huge dining room, and even an in-ground pool.

In my spare time, I took some time off and did some fun stuff, like kite surfing, snorking, safaris, and after my elective, I went down to Tanzania and climbed mt Kilimanjaro.

Overall, I learned a lot and had a lot of fun. In particular, Manu was my physician mentor and Prishita was the elective coordinator, and both made my elective with Global Aid Team unforgettable.

Program:
Location:
Posted: September 19, 2015
Overall:
10
Support:
10
Value:
10
By: mta015
Age:
24

Jambo my name is Radha and I'm a 4th year medical student from the UK. I came to Mombasa Kenya to do a 4week elective in Coast Province General hospital. Let me tell you now, it was the best decision I made! I have learnt so much from the doctors and patients and their families alike.

Coming from a National Health System, I wanted exposure to a low resource hospital in a developing country where I would be able to gain a vast amount of hands on experience. That is exactly what I got. There wasn't one day when I didn't learn a new skill or about a condition. The doctors were eager to teach and you were included into their team and your opinion and input mattered greatly to them. I had prejudged that their practice would be very different to back home, however, quite obviously, the knowledge and treatment guidelines were basically the same, only that the work ups and management was conducted to the best of their ability.

Being a government hospital meant patients had to pay for their treatment and investigations. Therefore Drs would have to manage the patients based on that pretence, sometimes having to skip certain steps.

The set-up is basic but it is incredible how much they are able to do still and the vast patient turnover. I chose to rotate through internal medicine, Obs Gynae, paediatrics and casualty/ER. These areas gave me a wide view of the standard there.

Having not been to a government hospital in a developing country before, I was apprehensive about how I would personally react more than fear of getting a shock. This was thanks to the Global aid team as they had thoroughly prepared me from weeks in advance.

Throughout my planning and decision making process, members of the team had been in touch via emails, text and calls to ensure that I knew exactly what I was paying for and what I could hope to achieve. Although I initially felt overwhelmed with the amount of discipline they proposed with regards to hospital timings and logbook completion, I later came to appreciate this level of organisation and care they had for wanting me to get the most out of the experience. They based my experience on objectives that I had set to achieve and tailored this whilst I was out here based on what I was able to see and get done and what further things I wanted to do. For example I was able to fit loads of IV lines and take bloods within the first week and so wanted more practice Suturing. I was able to do just that in casualty. As long as the staff know what you want to achieve and you show enthusiasm and intuition, you will get to do and see above and beyond what you had bargained for!

And it doesn't stop at the hospital... I felt I got a real feel of Kenya whilst I was there. Although awesome meals are provided, I made sure I ventured out and tried typical Kenyan food. The family I stayed with guided me to the best places which meant I didn't get ill even once!

Just like any country, you need to be smart and not put yourself in harms way. Your transport to and from hospital is in place so there is no worries there. The drivers are great fun and teach you about the area and the local language! Within the hospital you will have a mentor who will organise your time in hospital to make you sure you're not wasting your time and getting the most out of it. Then once in the team you will make friends with docs etc who will be so eager to show you around and make sure you see their country that you will never feel alone and in danger.

Any activities outside the hospital are organised by yourself but again the global aid team will be more than happy to give you ideas and contacts to get you the best deals and make sure you don't get ripped off. It obviously depends on your interests, for example I am really into nature rather than the touristy things, so I went on walks and to the beach. I even got the chance to do a kite surfing course. I am also a huge fan of food so I made sure I tried all the local delicacies! As long as you want to do things badly enough, you won't miss out!

I would advise taking lots of mosquito spray. And definitely make the most of the team. Ask them as many questions as possible. I felt bad for constantly annoying them to find out every last detail, but they were more than happy to help and I was grateful for all their advice as it meant my trip was successful and thoroughly enjoyable!! And once you're out there make the most of it, get stuck in, talk to doctors and patients about their experience and really get a feel of life for them. You will be amazed! Don't pity them because the majority are doing incredible things with their lives and are so happy! Just don't take them for granted and treat the people like they are below you. Developing country is just that.. They are developing and coming up in the world, and that is only possible because of its people!

I want to thank them all for being so great and can't wait to embark on my next adventure with them! Have a great elective and hope you pick coast general!

Program:
Location:
Posted: September 9, 2015
Overall:
10
Support:
10
Value:
10
By: RadhaM
Age:

Our medical degree concludes with a four week elective placement that can be undertaken anywhere in the world. A friend and I decided we were keen to go to India for an adventure and to gain an appreciation for medicine in the developing world. Around a year before departure after a lot of research we decided on Elective International (EI) being impressed by their website and initial contact with us.

This was when the problems started. We weren't assured of a location until the week before departure. Our university found it very difficult to make contact with them in order to sign insurance requirements etc.

Although the website still advertises New Delhi and Trivandrum, we were placed in Chandigarh. This was despite being told to obtain visas and flights for Mumbai. I was looking forward to being placed in such a large diverse city but it was not to be. Regardless we had paid out money and hoped for the best when we set out from Australia.

On arriving in Chandigarh we were at first relieved to find we were being looked after by a pleasant young girl who seemed very enthusiastic. It wasn't until the next day we realised we were in Panchkula, not Chandigarh, and had not been reassured by the company that they had any idea where we were.

The next day we were told we had to "meet" the Director of health. This meeting was actually our application being viewed for the first time. The result was humiliating and we were asked to lie and say our guide was our "friend" and we came "for our own interest".

On raising concerns with the company, we were told not to focus on the administrative errors and look forward to the clinical experience. Our concerns were made to seem petty.

Another aspect of the EI program is being able to undertake a program in a certain speciality. I had picked O&G and my friend had picked surgery. As we were pretending to be there "unofficially" the gynae doctors were understandably suspicious and not that keen for me to participate.

The next week we met another doctor who organised a rotating timetable for us and I had hoped that things were looking up. The next week was better but only through our pereseverance. We gave up on pretending to be friends with our guide and were able to explain to most doctors that we have paid to be here. Regardless most do not understand why we are here as we are at a small, non teaching hospital that doesn't normally take Indian students let alone international!

EI has been a nightmare to deal with and I could not suggest them to anyone. India is fantastic and I recommend travelling here any time!

Program:
Location:
Posted: November 12, 2014
Overall:
3
Support:
3
Value:
2
By: amy123
Age:
24

I am a sixth year medical student, and I did my elective at Coast Province General Hospital in Mombasa, Kenya. I found it an incredible experience, and Kenya is an amazing place to visit. I would recommend Elective International to anyone wanting to visit Africa on elective.

I travelled alone to Kenya and was really looked after by everyone involved. I was so pleased with how smoothly everything went. Everything from the airport, placement at the hospital, accommodation arrangements, and travel arrangements were made for me. I really appreciate how much effort was put into ensuring I had the best possible experience in Kenya!

This is my second times to visit Kenya thru the EI. I did lots of travelling and got to see most of Kenya. The people here are so friendly, and the country is so beautiful. I can’t wait to come back again! I am so glad I chose Kenya as an elective destination. This was such an out of the world experience. It surpassed any experienced I had ever imagined, and the hands-on experiences were unforgettable. It was an eye opener and an amazing opportunity to see interesting medicine, meet amazing people and do some travelling around a fascinating country. Elective International had a lot to do with making this experience so enjoyable. I had such a fulfilling experience, and I thank Elective International for making every aspect of my program memorable.

Finally, I would like to say a huge thank you for helping to organize a fantastic trip to Kenya! It was an unforgettable trip and I really enjoyed it!

Thank you so much! :)

Program:
Location:
Posted: October 26, 2014
Overall:
9
Support:
10
Value:
9
By: PPhon
Age:

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