Africa

Give a Heart To Africa

Having wanted to volunteer in Africa for a long time, my wife and I eventually got around to it last year and spent an amazing six months at Give a Heart To Africa in Moshi, Tanzania. It is very easy to start using all sorts of superlatives to describe our time at GHTA, but I can honestly say it was life changing. Working with a group of women (there were some men on the project, but it is primarily a women’s empowerment project), where the majority of them have never had an education beyond primary school was incredible. The women showed a willingness, a determination and an enthusiasm to learn that was nothing short of incredible. Teaching fractions using cut-up paper plates, preparing a basic CV and learning how to thread Maasai beads into bracelets and necklaces were just some of the skills we taught. I remember so well the first morning the women all arrived at school. They looked very nervous and were reluctant to talk even to their own classmates. We were very privileged to go back to Moshi this September to watch them graduate from GHTA a year later. The smiles and happy faces said everything, the women showed confidence and enthusiasm and really felt they were in a better position to improve their lives and the lives of their families. The project is managed by the most amazing Czech/Canadian woman called Monika. After receiving an education in Canada, she decided she wanted to give something back to other women and after several years volunteering in Africa she set-up GHTA. The project is located just off the University of Moshi Business School and on those mornings when there is no cloud you wake to the most wonderful view of Kilimanjaro. Our return in September was not the last time we will go back to GHTA. As is often the case when you hear volunteer stories, it is the volunteer who comes away with a feeling that they have received more than they were able to give, that is really how we felt when we left.

Program: Volunteer Abroad
Location: Africa
Posted: Oct 22, 2013
Overall:
10
Support:
10
Value:
10

Give a Heart To Africa

I spent 4 weeks volunteering at Give a Heart to Africa in Nov/Dec 2012 and enjoyed it so much I volunteered again in Sept 2013. GHTA is a small hands-on volunteer experience where you interact with the students (women from 25 to 60 years old) on a personal level. The goal of GHTA is to empower women by teaching them English, business, and vocational skills so that they can support themselves and pay their children's school fees. No teaching experience is needed as there is a curriculum provided and translators (former GHTA students) in each class. When I was at GHTA there were 5 volunteers although there is room for 6. The volunteers come from many countries (while I was there they were from Belgium, England, Australia, Canada, and the US). The volunteer house is very comfortable and has a family like atmosphere. Volunteering at GHTA was an eye opening, heartwarming, rewarding and inspiring experience. I am still in contact with many of my students as well as the volunteers who were there at the same time as me. While volunteering at GHTA I also was able to go on safari and visit Mt. Kilimanjaro. I highly recommend Give a Heart to Africa to anyone interested in truly making a difference volunteering while visiting a safe, beautiful country.

Program: Volunteer Abroad
Location: Africa
Posted: Oct 21, 2013
Overall:
10
Support:
10
Value:
10

Anyep

I worked with the Children with Disabilities and orphaned children. It was a course worth it. Anyep staff are friendly.
I made connections and I will go back to volunteer with Anyep, I recommend

Program: Volunteer Abroad
Location: Africa
Posted: Sep 12, 2013
Overall:
8
Support:
8
Value:
8

International Volunteer HQ (IVHQ)

With IVHQ I got the opportunity to spend two months in Ghana, Africa working in an orphanage for a very reasonable prize. These two months I spent in my placement were the best two months of my life and I can't wait to go back. IVHQ is a fantastic program and the cheapest program I could fine. But just because it is cheap doesnt mean it is weak- the staff was wonderful and helped all of the volunteers making them have the experience of a lifetime. I will definitely recommend this organization to anyone that wants to help the world. I loved every minute of my trip and it has changed my life in so many ways, and all of that couldn't have happened if it wasn't for IVHQ.

Program: Volunteer Abroad
Location: Africa
Posted: Sep 9, 2013
Overall:
9
Support:
9
Value:
9

Comments

Hi Kalei, thanks for sharing your review - we're pleased to hear you enjoyed your two months volunteering in Ghana and had a life changing experience. Thanks for volunteering with IVHQ!

Global Crossroad

My wife, 8 year old son and myself went to Masai land in Kenya to volunteer for 4 weeks. Our objective was to empower women and give them coaching to grow their business. Jimmy Wambua was our ground coordinator; he understood our needs perfectly. He put us in the hands of Virginia Sakuda, an amazing Masai woman who welcomed us like family into her home.

She knows everybody! She brought us to 8 different woman's group who do beadwork. She translated for us so that we could understand their challenges and the wealth of their art and culture. We worked with them to improve their sales skills at the market and we created a catalog of their products to make it easier for them.

Virginia also took us to a primary school in a remote area where we could donate school uniforms and supplies. It helped us understand the reality of the teachers and young students.

Jimmy also knows a lot of people in Kenya and is involved in his own projects. He works with volunteers all day and becomes a volunteer himself during his off time! He put is into relationship with Kibera Talking, a group of artists and musicians he works with. We did a 3 day workshop with them to spur their creativity, find ways to increase their reach and make more money from their art.

It was not always work! Virginia took us to a family wedding, organized celebrations for the volunteers at the end of their stay and we even went with her to a far away place where a new Masai leader was celebrating his nomination. I even got to dance with the Masai warriors there; they invited me to join them 2 minutes before the event. Here's the video (look for the white guy in the back!):

https://vimeo.com/72458978

What an adventure! We helped many people, we learned a lot, we had fun... we want to go back soon! We all loved it ;-)

Thanks to Jimmy and Virginia for making all this possible for us.

Program: Volunteer Abroad
Location: Africa
Posted: Sep 5, 2013
Overall:
10
Support:
10
Value:
10

Institute for Field Research Expeditions - IFRE

I never could imagine before that I will have so exciting and interesting experience. I have learned ad lived so many interesting things in my 2 weeks in Africa working in an orphanage, and sharing my days with local people and also other volunteers.

The support and help form the organizaton (local coordinator) was more than excellent.

I am sure that I could not forget this experience in al my life.

Thx so much for the opportunity to have such great experience.

Program: Volunteer Abroad
Location: Africa
Posted: Sep 1, 2013
Overall:
10
Support:
10
Value:
10

Comments

Thank you for sharing your time in Africa Paloma, we are excited as well that you had an excellent experience. The lives you touched in the orphanage will not forget you either!

Original Volunteers

After many years of wanting to go to Africa, and complete a volunteering holiday, my 30th birthday seemed like the perfect time. I searched around on the Internet for programmes and destinations at a reasonable price and original volunteers came out on top , ticking all the boxes. I spent weeks planning and packing bits and pieces. The jabs, insurance and planning would all be worth it. I was going on my own, and whilst I had travelled abroad alone before, I was still a little nervous. I also didn't know whether there would be lots of volunteers around in the village or not. I was finally ready to go after repackaging my case several times!
I didn't sleep a wink on the flight as planned, I was too excited.
I landed and got through the visa queue in not too bad a time. I came through arrivals and eagerly glanced around for my name on a board. What I hadn't planned for, was 'Africa time' so after a little wander around, I again stood by the arrivals area. Shortly after, a tall gentleman in a red shúkà approached me, and introduced himself as Josphat. He explained I would be staying at his house, and he took my suitcases; one full of my things, and one full to the brim with school equipment. We got into the taxi which did look a bit worse for wear, but 'this is Africa' !
We made the journey through Nairobi, past 'piki piki' or motorbikes, piled high with goods and people and the occasional animal! Hoards of people walking to work and the billboards for big named brands, of which I'm sure the majority of people cannot afford. Out of the city and through muddy roads, past the occasional town and eventually out into the open. We stopped at the town for water and goodies, and I bought the family lots of ingredients for meals, I had some trinkets but the basics were just as important. Flour, sugar, fat and water. I bought my SIM card for the time I was out here and the chap in the kiosk set it all up for me. We were in Ngong which, if you've never been to anywhere like Africa, out in the real areas of a destination, with real people, it could be daunting at first. People shouting 'sopa' to me, which I had no idea what it meant, but is just a friendly hello ! Women with their incredible masaai jewellery and men busying about working and the swarms of piki pikis whizzing past!
We continued our drive over the hill and I was finally welcomed to 'Masaailand' the bumpiest dirt track you could imagine, bouncing around trying to catch a glimpse of wildlife around me. It was fairly flat around with the odd mountain in the background. I was shown where giraffes usually gather and eventually we turned towards the hills we had come over and began to climb up it. About half way up we saw some houses, a school, the community centre and it was just beautiful. Children wandered freely and goats were grazing. It was now about 930 in the morning and as we approached the last bit of the journey, we pulled up alongside a group of people. There were 5 volunteers and their masaai families off to work. They were all in through the windows of the taxi to shake hands and welcome me. I said I would come and find them in a bit after I had unpacked. We pulled up at a gate, it was the gate of the house. There was a large garden with animal houses all over, chickens and chicks running around and the family came out to greet me. I was overwhelmed. I soon realised it wasn't Swahili they spoke, it was Maa their own language although some of it was similar. It took a while to realise I wasn't going to get the hang of it quickly! But they didn't mind! They had been host to volunteers before, they knew I was grateful and understood the hellos and thank you's I was saying. I had bread and butter and chai (tea) before heading out to find the others. It was a 15 minute walk across the hills to work and it was incredibly hot. Remember the Africa time I mentioned? It means nothing happens when you expect it to, it's always takes longer than you expect, everything is further than you think and it doesn't matter what time it is! After seeing the hole the others had been digging, we went back for lunch. I was shattered having been up since the previous morning! Cabbage soup and pasta. Chappatis and chai for lunch. It looked plain but lots of it. How wrong I was, it was delicious and I ate more than I would at home. After insisting I had seconds, I was bursting! We had a party to go to at a nearby home (20 min walk) and about half way through I found myself swaying about falling asleep, so I went with another volunteer back to my house. I woke up to a house full of activity. They had waited to eat dinner until I had woken up. Every seat in the lounge was full, and a friendly Aussie guy who I'd spotted earlier was with us. He was in the room next door to me, and had been there about a week. We chatted as a family, played card games, drank chai and had so much fun. I was instantly part of the family. it was pitch black at night and the family only had one light. So they were pleased I had plenty. My first day was over and I felt fabulous! There was so much to learn and do, it already felt like 10 days wouldn't be enough for me!
Opening the door to such amazing views and incredible people around was sensational. I achieved some amazing work with the children, the community and I wouldn't hesitate about going back. Even with families. Children would be so safe in the village. Nairobi takes some getting used to and I spent a whole day travelling around on local transport which is quite an experience. I had a fantastic birthday and we had crisps and balloons and fizzy orange. This was he best birthday party I could have imagined. These amazing people have nothing. They don't want our lifestyle, they just need support to maintain their own way of living. Don't get me wrong, they are amazed by cameras, a few have cheap mobile phones and they love hand me down branded clothes and anything ou don't wish to take home, but they are true masaai used to their own way of doing things, and I have to say I thought many times while I was there how wonderful it was to not have he stress of rushing around in a car, going to work and paying bills! The grown what they need with the help from volunteers, they build community buildings with the help of volunteers. They are given a lot, but on the other hand, what they give us is priceless. Other things I did was to fund materials for a two cubicle toilet and I also took a trip to amboseli national park in my own safari van. I wanted to see Kilimanjaro as my father and grandfather had climbed it years ago so that was a must. A piki piki to ngong to top up on supplies isn't very much at all so easy to do.
I could go on with a day to day diary of what I got up to, but it's down to you to create your own adventure, as a new volunteer. Yes it's a bit costly to start with, but whilst you're there you hardly spend anything and just enjoy helping others and meeting new people. I have take away so many incredible memories and have friends for life. I was also given the name 'Namayiana' which means blessed one in masaai. And that is exactly how I feel. Blessed !
I still keep in contact with the village and volunteers I met there too. If I could, I would go back tomorrow!!
So sign up now for your own volunteer trip! Don't put it off for 'the right time' that time is now!
Good luck

Program: Volunteer Abroad
Location: Africa
Posted: Aug 27, 2013
Overall:
10
Support:
10
Value:
10

Frontier

I went to Madagascar with frontier for four weeks of teaching - one of the most memorable four weeks of my life.
The best things about the trip were: the classes and the people I met out there.

It was the summer holidays for the Madagascan children, but luckily that still meant plenty of teaching! During the week, every morning we had a short sunny walk through Hell-Ville to the school. Here we would teach, mostly in pairs, girls and boys with ages from about 8 to 16. Often a little shy at first, they were always incredibly keen to learn and it was brilliant seeing them improve! (I only have basic GCSE french which I can hardly remember but I still managed - Marzia the teaching co-ordinator was always around to help translate and explain if ever we needed some). Then three afternoons a week we would also teach the adult class. These were very different as many of the adults were very capable in English conversation and writing, and incredibly enthusiastic to become even better!! As you will find the malagasy are incredibly friendly - once after class they took us to find the best street food in Hell-Ville. And most memorable was our final night teaching, where one student performed a rap he had written, another pair performed (a slightly out of tune) cover of 'call me maybe', ending with everyone to singing and dancing along.

The teaching house is basic, but as long as everyone made the effort to look after it was a great place to stay - in the centre of town with access to the roof with a beautiful view day and night, not far from the market, the schools or the local bar Nandipo's where we could get wifi and the occasional cheeky pizza! We enjoyed making use of the local food to cook all our meals. Spending all day everyday together and sharing such an experience, everyone in the teaching house becomes close very quickly .. a bit like a family! I miss everyone there and I wish I could do the whole experience all over again!!

Program: TEFL
Location: Africa
Posted: Aug 26, 2013
Overall:
10
Support:
10
Value:
10

Comments

Thanks for your review of the Madagascar Teaching project.

Frontier

My first encounter of Madagascar was at Antananarivo airport and being rushed by the Malagasy men trying to help you with your luggage. All of them were wearing jumpers and scarves so straight away I was thinking I had packed for the wrong weather. How wrong was I?! Once all of the frontier crew had gathered into the small minivans at Nosy Be airport, with our luggage strapped to the top, I was loving the heat! For the first two weeks while I was out here, I was doing my Padi Open Water and Advanced Open Water. The staff were great and teaching us how to dive and making sure we were breathing through our regulators rather than trying to breathe through our noses. Victor, our Malagasy boat handler, was great at helping us with our gear and we got to dive all around the place, even to Tanakely where we got to do some deep diving at around 24metres. Turtles were of course a main feature of our dives as we were always looking out for them. We even saw some dolphins while we were in the boat but weren’t close enough to see them under water. Camp life is simple but very comfortable, with three huts for all the volunteers. It is always interesting hearing your friends talking (or in our case shouting) in their sleep and always makes for good stories in the mornings! For chilling during the day there is always the beach or the hammocks and we even have some homemade sofas, with the covers hand sewn. Food on camp is rice and beans. It is actually surprising the different ways you can cook those but you get use to it and there is always warm white bread to buy in the morning for about 20p so it is definitely worth it. And you can always go to Philippe’s, the local French guy’s house, and buy some spaghetti or chips. The science table is where we do most of our learning of the fishes, invertebrates and corals and the staff are great at developing fun ways to learn all the names of the species. I’ve done one survey so far and I was assigned to take the readings for Benthic (coral). I was nervous at first but Margo was very supportive if I was unsure of what type of coral I could see on the line. Finally, just being around people with your common interests is so much fun and we spend lots of time either playing cards or just chatting at the dinner table. We even had a round of “Take me out” last week were all the men had to show us there skills and the girls had their torches as their lights.

Program: Volunteer Abroad
Location: Africa
Posted: Aug 21, 2013
Overall:
10
Support:
10
Value:
10

Frontier

My first impressions of the project were very good, camp life is basic but the dive hut was professional and organised, with the state of the art equipment available to borrow kept clean, and serviced regularly. I was taken on multiple point out dives which involves no data collection, simply to speed my learning and ensure I was confident identifying fish before participating in surveys. The staff were consistently willing to talk me through the target fish and invertebrate species using books, slide shows and other visual aids such as flash cards. This helped me to pass the relevant fish and invertebrate tests thus enabling me to become involved in the science, achieving my goal for participating in the project.

Africa can seam like a daunting country to visit alone but having spent two weeks in the country I soon felt confident enough to stay a night in the closest town Hell Ville on the weekends, and even sample the bars and the favorite club Discotec. I adored the culture, from the delicious street food, especially sambos (similar to a samosa) to the music and dancing provided by the locals. Camp is situated on a beautiful sand beach with coral, no more than a 10 minute swim, right on our doorstep. Although basic camp has its charms and the rice and beans really do grow on you

The staff were excellent, I could not fault them and they have been a huge contributing factor leading to my thorough enjoyment there. They are all exceedingly intelligent, with varied degrees and among them offer a huge amount of information for anyone keen to learn. They offered support with education, advice for dealing with camp life and even emotional support when missing home for a brief moment or two. Frontier were extremely supportive, sending multiple email’s staying in touch and asking about my welfare. The briefing weekend prior to the beginning of my project was very useful and I felt fully prepared.

Program: Gap Year
Location: Africa
Posted: Aug 15, 2013
Overall:
10
Support:
10
Value:
10

Comments

Thanks loads for your review of our Madagascar Marine Conservation and Diving project.

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